Your intellectual interests may not fit tidily within a single academic discipline. MAPH supports a wide array of projects that transcend disciplinary boundaries. Indeed, the University of Chicago as a whole is known as a place where an interdisciplinary ethos permeates intellectual life.
Interdisciplinary projects in MAPH usually take the form of a traditional academic thesis, in fields such as cultural studies, media theory, and gender studies. But MAPH students sometimes shape their interdisciplinary projects into nontraditional forms, such as long-form journalism, curatorial projects, cultural policy proposals, or documentary film. The opportunity to take challenging courses in a variety of fields is unique and essential to the MAPH experience.
Interdisciplinary Resources at UChicago:
 
Selected MAPH Alumni with Interdisciplinary Thesis Projects
 
Michelle Neuffer
"My project was essentially a comparison of two different methods Americans used to process the use of the atom bomb in the 1950s and 60s: nuclear test films and popular culture. Technically I was on the cinema studies track in MAPH, but this thesis wound up being a blend of cinema studies, historical analysis, cultural studies, and library naps."
Michelle Neuffer
MAPH'13
Development Communications Coordinator
 
afterMAPH: Alumni Profiles
 
Michelle Neuffer
Michelle Neuffer
MAPH'13
Development Communications Coordinator
Goodman Theatre
My project was essentially a comparison of two different methods Americans used to process the use of the atom bomb in the 1950s and 60s: nuclear test films and popular culture. Through the test film Operation Cue (1955) and Batman: The Movie (1966) I argued that the use of the atom bomb and the devastation it caused was so incomprehensible it only found its expression in American consciousness via a kind of "gallows optimism"—where something is so horrible we can only laugh. Technically I was on the cinema studies track in MAPH, but this thesis wound up being a blend of cinema studies, historical analysis, cultural studies, and library naps.
 
Jesse Soodalter
Jesse Soodalter
Current Student
Artist and Hematologist
The University of Chicago Hospitals
Jesse, a practicing hematologist and oncologist, came to MAPH to use the full range of humanistic interdisciplinary inquiry to develop new and fruitful ways to of thinking about the problem of mortality. For her thesis project, Jesse has created The Living Mortal Project, a collaborative workshop series supported by the Neubauer Collegium.
 
Teddy Roland
Teddy Roland
MAPH'14
Research Assistant
Neubauer Collegium: Global Literary Networks Project
My thesis began in periodical studies and ended in historical poetics. Drawing largely from Poetry magazine's editorial records held at the Regenstein Library, I recovered a literary and political discourse during the 1910s that compels rereading of free verse poems and prosody from that period. In particular, I examined the ways in which the prosody of Carl Sandburg's "Chicago" became charged simultaneously with radical politics and market forces.
 
Michael O'Malley
Michael O'Malley
MAPH'14
Assistant Director, Leadership Giving
The University of Chicago
My thesis explores the role of the arts in economic and community development. Using case studies of two arts-based development projects, I examine the conditions necessary for these projects to succeed in balancing economic progress and social equity.
Mike was a recipient of the 2014 MAPH Thesis Awards. You can read his thesis in its entirety on Colloquium.